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Three Excerpts

 

 

We have uploaded three excerpts for the three books that should be published on May 30.

Excerpt link for Jaan’s Ehlvest’s Grandmaster Opening Preparation.

Excerpt link for Playing 1.e4 – French Defence & Sicilian Sidelines.

Excerpt link for Playing 1.e4 – Sicilian Main Lines.

Note that both Playing 1.e4 excerpts include abridged variation indexes. But Ehlvest’s book does not, as that book is all about words and explanations, not variations.

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  1. Thomas
    May 8th, 2018 at 17:25 | #1

    Loking at the excerpt of Ehlvest’s book – the Karpov- Korchnoi match was in 1974, not 1975….

  2. Paul H
    May 8th, 2018 at 17:31 | #2

    On the Ehlvest book I’m also curious what the “Opening Reportoire for Women” represents. QGD?

  3. James2
    May 8th, 2018 at 18:06 | #3

    @Johnshaw

    I had a quick one. In the French book, in what chapter is 11..Qc7 covered in the Tarrasch. It looks like it would have to be in Chapter 5, section D. Is that right?

    Thanks John.

    James

  4. Frank van Tellingen
    May 8th, 2018 at 18:39 | #4

    John already answered this question under the other post@Paul H

  5. Seth A.
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:07 | #5

    I see that the English Attack with Qf3 is covered against the Taimanov. 😀
    I would have loved to see a bit more about the Najdorf though…

  6. mn
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:15 | #6

    Any chance you could leak which 10th move is recommended in the Dragon, and which 12th in the French Tarrasch with 3…Nf6/11…Qc7 – ?

    🙂

  7. mn
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:15 | #7

    What are the odds of you leaking which 10th move is recommended in the Dragon, and which 12th in the French Tarrasch with 3…Nf6/11…Qc7 – ?

    🙂

  8. mn
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:16 | #8

    (sorry for the double post – i didn’t think my original comment had gone through :s)

  9. James2
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:40 | #9

    12 h3 is quite new and has been scoring well over the last few years….

  10. James2
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:43 | #10

    Sorry for the additional post, but I pressed enter at the wrong time in post #9.

    I wanted to add that 12 Nc3 a5 13 Re1 0-0 14 h3 is also quite good. I hope it is one of those two against 11..Qc7.

    James

  11. JB
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:43 | #11

    Seems to be missing a line against 2…Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 in the abridged index unless I’m missing something

  12. James2
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:45 | #12

    @JB
    Isn’t that line meant to be not so good beacause of 6 Nxc6? It might be given in the notes.

    James

  13. JB
    May 8th, 2018 at 19:58 | #13

    James2 :
    @JB
    Isn’t that line meant to be not so good beacause of 6 Nxc6? It might be given in the notes.
    James

    Yes Nxc6 seems to be the way or black ends up playing d5 in one move and has been move ordered out of the maroczy. Even if its not the best line it should be covered. Can’t see it being too obscure to not be covered so maybe in the text but not the abridged.

  14. PaulH
    May 8th, 2018 at 21:50 | #14
  15. Topnotch
    May 9th, 2018 at 02:20 | #15

    @ John Shaw

    I was really excited when I saw the abridged index for Playing 1.e4 – French + Sicilian Sidelines, especially Chapter 9, as the line recommended there 12.Bf1!? is one that I used to play regularly and would like to start playing again. Sadly the following continuation dampened my early enthusiasm for 12.Bf1!?:

    1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4.exd5 Qxd5 5.Ngf3 cxd4 6.Bc4 Qd6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Nb3 Nc6 9.Nbxd4 Nxd4 10.Nxd4 a6 11.Re1 Qc7 12.Bf1!? Bd6 13.Nf5 Bxh2+ 14.Kh1 Kf8 15.Qd4 exf5 16.Qxf6 h6! 17.Qd4 Bd6 18.Bc4 Be6! 19.Bxe6 Re8 20.Qd5 Qe7 21.Qxf5 Qh4+ 22.Kg1 Qh2+ 23.Kf1 Qh1+ 24.Ke2 Rxe6+ 25.Qxe6 Qxe1+ 26.Kxe1 fxe6 27.Be3 Ke7 =

    Optically the final position looks a smidgen better for White, but in reality this endgame is a relatively easy draw for Black. Surprisingly this has not yet occurred in OTB tournament play, but it has in correspondence chess and unsurprisingly was comfortably drawn every time. This line is fairly forcing and I have been unable to find any meaningful improvements for White.

    I sincerely hope you have succeeded where I have failed, as I would love to make this line my main Tarrasch weapon of choice again.

    Cheers.

  16. John Shaw
    May 9th, 2018 at 09:18 | #16

    Thomas :
    Loking at the excerpt of Ehlvest’s book – the Karpov- Korchnoi match was in 1974, not 1975….

    Very true. I am annoyed I missed this in proofreading, as I know very well it was 1974. But I also know how to spell “first” and yet the non-word “frst” once appeared in one of your books. After all these years I should be used to missing errors, as it always happens to some degree, but it’s freshly annoying very time.

    Anyway, thanks for pointing it out Thomas. We can fix the Forward Chess version, but too late for the book.

  17. John Shaw
    May 9th, 2018 at 09:21 | #17

    JB :
    Seems to be missing a line against 2…Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 in the abridged index unless I’m missing something

    We do cover that line, and I am not giving much away by saying 6.Nxc6 is our move. Just a paragraph or two is enough to deal with it.

    It’s just a minor line, and not big enough to make it into our abridged variation index. It is there in the full index in the book, but just as a brief bracketed mention.

  18. JB
    May 9th, 2018 at 10:57 | #18

    John Shaw :

    JB :
    Seems to be missing a line against 2…Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 in the abridged index unless I’m missing something

    We do cover that line, and I am not giving much away by saying 6.Nxc6 is our move. Just a paragraph or two is enough to deal with it.
    It’s just a minor line, and not big enough to make it into our abridged variation index. It is there in the full index in the book, but just as a brief bracketed mention.

    Thanks John. Chucky used to play it so not entirely frivolous. What do you recommend against 2..d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 early pawn moves rather than Nf6 eg 4…e6/a6 or g6? Just play Nc3 and they probably need to play Nf6 or is it better to make the most of this move order and play c4?

  19. John Shaw
    May 9th, 2018 at 15:01 | #19

    @JB

    In general, when we can go c2-c4 against a Sicilian line, we go c2-c4 (just one or two exceptions).

    And I agree that the 5…g6 is line is not absurd, but after White takes on c6, Black needs to take back with the d-pawn and allow a queen exchange on d8. White is only a little better, but he needed to show very little effort to gain that edge.

    I know there are other chess questions above, but I think the excerpts give quite a lot of info. Also, I need to get back to emailing the dozens of people I have been stalling with “I will get back to you when Playing 1.e4 is finished.”

  20. Seth A.
    May 9th, 2018 at 15:40 | #20

    @John Shaw

    I know I am asking a lot, but it is possible to give a vague hint about your recommendation in the Najdorf English Attack after 8…Be7 9.Qd2 0-0 10.0-0-0 Nbd7? 😀

  21. Andrew Greet
    May 9th, 2018 at 16:18 | #21

    @Seth A.
    We attack on the kingside. The g-pawn will be involved, in the not-too-distant future.

  22. Thomas
    May 9th, 2018 at 16:59 | #22

    @Andrew Greet
    11.g3?

  23. Pinpon
    May 9th, 2018 at 18:49 | #23

    @John Shaw
    Another small typo in the excerpt ( p21 : stronger then ) but it won’t prevent me to buy that book !

  24. Seth
    May 9th, 2018 at 19:54 | #24

    @Andrew Greet

    Beautiful response.

    Signed, Seth (with no letter A)

  25. Raul
    May 9th, 2018 at 21:26 | #25

    I’m slightly surprised by 6.f3 agianst the classical. I used to play this a lot from the blackside and felt that 6.Bg5 was the only try for a theoretical edge (and a good try at that).

    The Elvest excerpt looks very promising.

  26. Frank
    May 9th, 2018 at 22:10 | #26

    Well, f3 is easier to learn, more positional and if you know your stuff, you can get a pleasant middle game with White, I would say. Besides that, Negi already wrote an excellent book on 6.Bg5. @Raul

  27. Seth A.
    May 10th, 2018 at 10:31 | #27

    I looked at f3 against the Classical for a bit, and it can be a great weapon, and it is much easier to learn. There are also lots of new ideas to be tried in that line as well, so it is definitely a good practical choice.

  28. Raul
    May 10th, 2018 at 15:00 | #28

    I agree. 6.Bg5 comes with a large theoretical overhead so if they can make 6.f3 work it would be a great practical solution.

  29. Frank
    May 10th, 2018 at 18:15 | #29

    O well, in the end chess is (for all we know) a draw, so in the end it comes down to skillful play.@Raul

  30. JB
    May 10th, 2018 at 19:34 | #30

    Very interesting that from being a sideline less than 5 years ago the Qf3 Taimanov has been chosen as the main line for white by 3 major sicilian books now. Illingworth and Kotronias already showed some very new ideas so looking forward to see what John has seen after standing on the shoulders of these giants.

  31. Matthew
    May 17th, 2018 at 12:57 | #31

    Looking at the Ehlvest excerpt, he makes the point about looking at the evolution of openings. I have never understood why opening books don’t take this route. I recall an old book by Jansa for Batsford “Dynamics of Chess Strategy” that presented his recommendations by describing how various lines evolved (I am thinking of the line vs Sveshnikov in particular). Wouldn’t this future proof opening books by giving a point of reference as theory moves on?

    It also means that an author can validly present a line that was theoretically equal but with thoughts about where/how improvements might be found (that fitted with the evolution of the opening).

  32. Ram
    May 17th, 2018 at 14:01 | #32

    Hi Jacob,

    Can we expect a book on Reti from quaility chess in near future? Could you give us an expected publication date for Sicillian Taimanov?

    regards,
    Ram

    • Jacob Aagaard
      May 18th, 2018 at 05:45 | #33

      No to the Reti and we do not come with dates in our own pace, because we want them to be truthful. We have just finished a big project, now we will breathe.

  33. Nestor
    May 17th, 2018 at 18:18 | #34

    Mihail Marin’s QC book on the Spanish from Black’s perspective is written like that. One of my favourite chess books.

  34. Jacob Aagaard
    May 17th, 2018 at 18:44 | #35

    @Nestor
    Our Najdorf lines are a bit like that.

  35. May 19th, 2018 at 20:01 | #36

    I’ve quickly looked through these blogs but haven’t seen anything (could have simply missed it) regarding when we are likely to see an excerpt from the Queens Indian?

  36. Jacob Aagaard
    May 19th, 2018 at 21:13 | #37

    @Michael
    As always, when it is sent to the printer. The book is not done and we do not make promises of dates we are not 100% on. It is next on the list.

  37. Pinpon
    May 20th, 2018 at 19:13 | #38

    Any news from Boris’s third opus ?

  38. Jacob Aagaard
    May 20th, 2018 at 20:06 | #39

    @Pinpon
    I have been busy. We have done a lot of work on it.

  39. Kev
    May 23rd, 2018 at 01:26 | #40

    Hi all,

    Is the release date for Playing 1. e4 of May 30 for the Hardback version, Paperback version or both?

    Kind Regards,

    Kev

  40. John Shaw
    May 23rd, 2018 at 12:17 | #41

    @Kev

    For both ‘Playing 1.e4’ books, May 30 is the publication date for both hardcover and paperback.

    For ‘Grandmaster Opening Preparation’ May 30 is the publication date for hardcover only.

  41. TonyRo
    May 23rd, 2018 at 12:21 | #42

    So ‘Playing 1.e4’ on Forward Chess…today then? 😉

  42. Paul H
    May 23rd, 2018 at 12:47 | #43

    They are there….at least on iOS.

  43. mn
    May 23rd, 2018 at 14:49 | #44

    Are they? I don’t see them.

  44. Pinpon
    May 23rd, 2018 at 17:26 | #45

    All of them on IOS ( IPhone , not IPad yet )

  45. JB
    May 23rd, 2018 at 18:39 | #46

    Anyone downloaded the FC version yet? I’m waiting for the physical copy on order. I thought it was going to be £15.99 on android but instead a very reasonable £13.99 – so thinking of buying an electronic copy as well. Waiting on the first reviews before I do…
    The interesting Nd5!? sac in the Kan excerpt is a good omen methinks…

  46. Ray
    May 25th, 2018 at 14:06 | #47

    @Pinpon
    Does anyone know why these books aren’t available for the iPad yet? I really need them!

  47. The Doctor
    May 25th, 2018 at 14:54 | #48

    @Ray
    I’ve got them on mine

  48. James2
    May 25th, 2018 at 15:01 | #49

    @The Doctor
    Wjhat are your first impressions please (my physical copies will arrive next week hopefully)?

    As a specific, what is recommended against 11..Qc7 in the main line Tarrasch (C06)? The abridged index doesn’t actually even mention it.

    Thank you.

    James

  49. The Doctor
    May 25th, 2018 at 15:58 | #50

    12 h3

  50. James2
    May 25th, 2018 at 16:22 | #51

    @The Doctor
    Yes! That was my suggestion on one of these blog threads months and months ago!

    James

  51. The Doctor
    May 25th, 2018 at 16:40 | #52

    @James2
    Yes it recommends 12 h3
    Initial impressions are good but I haven’t looked at the content in great detail. For me a MASSIVE plus when buying QC books is the brilliant editing and ease of use.

    To contest one book I use a lot The Richter-Rauzer Reborn (I use this in conjunction with GN Rep Dragon 2) is great in terms on content and analysis but an absolute nightmare to navigate through

  52. James2
    May 25th, 2018 at 17:07 | #53

    @The Doctor
    Yes I agree with you in terms of navigation.

    I must say, I have also found Chess Stars books easy to navigate too when using the index at the back of their books.

    James

  53. AliceB
    May 26th, 2018 at 20:19 | #54

    @james2

    Both books are very good. But, after 2 years, we awaited little bit more? 🙂
    Most of chapters are inspiring and creative, but Sveshnikov (B33) and Najdorf chapters looked mainly as summary todays knowledge about them.

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