Home > GM Repertoire > The Pirc Defence by Mihail Marin – an update

The Pirc Defence by Mihail Marin – an update

Naturally we try to make our repertoire books complete, but when we miss a line, we try to offer readers an update to patch it. Such is the case with Mihail Marin’s “The Pirc Defence“. A couple of lines sadly escaped our attention, so Mihail has analysed and written an update which you can download as a pdf at the following  link: The Pirc Defence update.

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  1. Tobias
    March 10th, 2018 at 21:20 | #1

    Not a book I have or plan on buying, but the service is _highly_ appreciated! (thumbs up)

  2. Ray
    March 11th, 2018 at 11:09 | #2

    Thanks a lot for this excellent update!!

    Just out of curiosity: has anyone out there in the meantime solved the problem in the line with f2-f3 and …d6-d5, mentioned elsewhere on this blog?

  3. CbT
    March 11th, 2018 at 21:02 | #3

    Ray :
    Thanks a lot for this excellent update!!
    Just out of curiosity: has anyone out there in the meantime solved the problem in the line with f2-f3 and …d6-d5, mentioned elsewhere on this blog?

    What would be the moves for this line? Having gone through many of the comments here, it doesn’t ring a bell for me immediately.

    Good to see an update. Facing 3.Nd2 is a bit of a bore so if you can reel out something Marin approved and go grab a coffee while your opponent thinks about overdefending (every square he can think of) I see that as a step forward.

    The 4.Be3/4.Bf4 line with a well timed Bh6 got an interesting proposed solution I have to say. Looks like a key line to study well if you want to avoid suffering.

    Some lines which would be in the update if I had a say as they are not obviously less relevant than the variation+line covered. I realise though that if the author took his time to cover those as well as he did the lines in the actual update a lot of more work would be involved and I’m grateful the author took the time he did here.

    Have a nice evening.

  4. Fer
    March 12th, 2018 at 07:33 | #4

    Thanks for this update!
    @John, is there any place where all updates are available in pdf, pgn or another format?

  5. Ray
    March 12th, 2018 at 07:36 | #5

    @ CbT

    The line I mentioned was in a post bij AliceB in reaction to the vlog bij Nikos on the Marin book:

    “Secondly… Chapters with 4.Be3 are the most important and I think that c6+b5 system (against all white setups) is not universal. Recomended line 4…c6 5.Qd2 Nbd7 6.f3 b5 (i would prefer 5..b5 6.f3 Nbd7 move order) 7.g4 Bg7 8.h4 h5 9.g5 Nh7 (stem game Smirin-Gofstein, but mentioned Moskalenko too) 10.Nge2 Nb6 11.b3 d5 (!Marin) – but after 12.e5 Nf8 13.Nd1 with idea something like Nd1-b2-(d3), a4 (will force b4), f4, 0-0 and trying open position with c2-c3 (look at hole c5) or even f4-f5 looks dangerous for black (there is no real counterplay, black can only sit and wait).”

  6. Ray
    March 12th, 2018 at 07:42 | #6

    Slightly off-topic, but I couldn’t find another suitable place: in his new book on Bc4 against the open games, Delchev calls Nikos’ recommendation …Nd7! in a line of the Bishop’s Opening “utterly shallow” (or similar words), and gives three options for white, two of which were not mentioned in Nikos’ book. According to Delchev, black should play …d7-d5 rather than …d7-d6 against the Bishop’s Opening. Any ideas if Delchev has a point or is just exaggerating here?

  7. CbT
    March 12th, 2018 at 15:39 | #7

    Ray :
    @ CbT
    The line I mentioned was in a post bij AliceB in reaction to the vlog bij Nikos on the Marin book:
    “Secondly… Chapters with 4.Be3 are the most important and I think that c6+b5 system (against all white setups) is not universal. Recomended line 4…c6 5.Qd2 Nbd7 6.f3 b5 (i would prefer 5..b5 6.f3 Nbd7 move order) 7.g4 Bg7 8.h4 h5 9.g5 Nh7 (stem game Smirin-Gofstein, but mentioned Moskalenko too) 10.Nge2 Nb6 11.b3 d5 (!Marin) – but after 12.e5 Nf8 13.Nd1 with idea something like Nd1-b2-(d3), a4 (will force b4), f4, 0-0 and trying open position with c2-c3 (look at hole c5) or even f4-f5 looks dangerous for black (there is no real counterplay, black can only sit and wait).”

    Ah. Thank you.

    Looks more pleasant for white but achieving concrete advantage in such a blocked position is never easy. That being said the basic concept of reshuffling the knights followed by c3 looks like a decent way of handling the position. White can actually go for this in many different ways (for example both 13.Nd1 and 13.Nc1) with similar play. Maybe 13.Ng3 can be a place for the knight as well.

  8. Ray
    March 12th, 2018 at 20:08 | #8

    @CbT
    Stockfish agrees this is more pleasant for white, though it’s always dangerous to trust the computer in these blocked positions. It looks a bit passive though for black. What is his active plan? Or can he just wait and see what white does?

  9. AliceB
    March 13th, 2018 at 12:13 | #9

    It’s nice to see my old comment 🙂

    I analysed lot of lines from the book and moreless they stood my test, however … for some reason I see some systems in book boring (it is my personal opinion only).

    After all, even if the updated line hold for black, there is still one more problem.
    page 213:

    1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Be3 O-O 6.Qd2 c6 7.Bh6
    b5 8.Bd3 Bg4 9.h4 Bxf3 10.gxf3 e5 and now MM analysed 11.de5 and 11.0-0-0 but… there is one old correspondence game Polak-Stepak 1999, where white played 11.h5! and after Nxh5 12.O-O-O position is very sharp but looks very unpleasant for black.

    You can start your own engines…. 🙂

  10. James2
    March 13th, 2018 at 21:31 | #10

    @AliceB

    My computer wants 12..Kh8, and disliked everything else. I tried 12..Nf4 giving a pawn up and it didn’t immediately dislike this. That could be a way to go, although I would rather be white in that position.

    James

  11. John Shaw
    March 14th, 2018 at 11:55 | #11

    @AliceB

    @James2

    I have not analysed 11.h5 (there is a different book I am working on) but it seems to me that instead of 7…b5 in the above line, if Black plays 7…Nbd7 then it transposes to Mihail Marin’s update. So if 12.h5 is a problem (and as I said, I don’t know if it is) then the update fixes it too.

  12. Fer
    March 16th, 2018 at 11:20 | #12

    Fer :
    Thanks for this update!
    @John, is there any place where all updates are available in pdf, pgn or another format?

    Anyone know if there is a repository with the updates purblished by QC?
    thanks

  13. Phil Collins
    March 16th, 2018 at 11:26 | #13

    Question: Why learn the opening repertoire of Ulf Anderson? Is there anyone who thinks he plays like Anderson if he plays his opening repertoire?

  14. TonyRo
    March 16th, 2018 at 12:56 | #14

    Counter-Question: Do you think any repertoire is, for the most part, unique? Aren’t you always playing like someone else? 🙂

  15. James2
    March 16th, 2018 at 12:57 | #15

    @Phil Collins
    This comment seems utterly extraneous to this thread. Would you care to elucidate?

  16. Phil Collins
    March 16th, 2018 at 13:12 | #16

    @James2
    I don’t like reducing the game of chess to opening (preparation).

  17. Jacob Aagaard
    March 16th, 2018 at 13:23 | #17

    @Fer
    Front page, look in the left column

  18. Phil Collins
    March 16th, 2018 at 14:19 | #18

    @TonyRo

    To create an Opening Repertoire based on games played by Anderson is funny. For Anderson chess is an endgame with 32 pieces!

  19. Thomas
    March 16th, 2018 at 14:48 | #19

    @Phil Collins

    I think it’s the start of a new series. For each grandmaster a repertoire book, all written by the same author.

  20. Jacob Aagaard
    March 16th, 2018 at 17:04 | #20

    @Thomas
    What about different authors, writing each a version of repertoire books on Andersson?

  21. Phil Collins
    March 16th, 2018 at 17:19 | #21

    @Thomas
    They should start with Ivanchuk: “Play anything against everything!”

  22. James2
    March 16th, 2018 at 17:59 | #22

    @Jacob Aagaard
    Perhaps we could start by Lakdawala giving it a try….

    James

  23. Thomas
    March 16th, 2018 at 22:28 | #23

    I hope Ulf gets some royalties from all these books.

  24. TonyRo
    March 16th, 2018 at 22:47 | #24

    Ulf is one of my very favorite players – I would buy the hell out of anything with his name on it. 😉

  25. Ray
    March 17th, 2018 at 08:38 | #25

    I didn’t even realise Anderson has had a repertoire for the past 20 years or so… I always get suspicious if a book claims that you can get by just on ‘general principles’. Even for such openings as the London that is not possible anymore if you have a milligramme of ambition. “How to bore your opponent to death” would imo be a more appropriate title. Maybe we can post some suggestions on the most boring opening lines. With 1.e4 I would like to propose Qe2 against the Petroff (boring against boring), and of course the French Exchange cannot be omitted either. Then against the Alekhine of course 2.Nc3. And against 1…e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 the Scotch Four Knights is also a serious contender.

  26. John Johnson
    March 17th, 2018 at 11:19 | #26

    I would bet he does a bit of prep, isn’t he a force in correspondence chess?

  27. March 17th, 2018 at 16:53 | #27

    @Ray

    Grandmaster Chess Strategy (based on Andersson’s games and openings) gives a pretty good insight into Andersson’s opening repertoire as white……it was very much built around 1Nf3.

    Many of the lines/systems Andersson used are still relevant today so I will withhold judgement on the book until I see how the author has updated the theory on this still very popular first move choice.

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