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Judit Polgar – Questions and Answers

 

Over the next week we will be lucky enough to be visited online by a world class player. Judit Polgar will visit the blog occasionally to answer questions posed by readers in the comments to this post. This is your chance to pick the brain of a chess superstar.

 

Judit’s new book How I Beat Fischer’s Record  is published today.

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  1. garryk
    September 21st, 2012 at 15:44 | #1

    Will you beat my peak record of 2851 before that norwegian kid?

  2. garryk
    September 21st, 2012 at 15:48 | #2

    And do you think you’d have been able to deal with Deep Blue better than me? If I remember well it was your or your sister to ask for a chance of a match with the silicon monster…

  3. SovietSchool
    September 21st, 2012 at 23:20 | #3

    I am interested in whether the training that Judit received differed from what her Two Sisters
    Received, with experience of how her sisters fared was anything modified?

  4. September 22nd, 2012 at 00:46 | #4

    Judit, I think that Hou Yifan is a great player, but she would do better for her long term development to concentrate on open events instead of beating up on the women players. What would you recommend for her career development and what do you think of her game. Thanks.

  5. September 22nd, 2012 at 04:12 | #5

    Judit, what chess player had the most profound influence on your chess playing career? thx

  6. September 22nd, 2012 at 04:32 | #6

    Hi Judit, I’m looking forward to your book very much! What do you feel is the biggest difference between you and a 2600 player? Between you and a 2800 player?

  7. Seth
    September 22nd, 2012 at 07:43 | #7

    Dear Judit,

    First, congratulations on a fine career that will hopefully continue for a long time!

    Chess has undergone many changes over the years: the Romantic era of Morphy’s day, the birth of positional play with Steinitz, the hypermoderns with Reti, etc. What do you think sets the current era of chess apart from the past and what do you think the next big evolutionary step will be?

    Thank you for your time,

    Seth from the United States

  8. Oldsalt
    September 22nd, 2012 at 20:00 | #8

    Dear Judith,
    I’m a 63 year old chess enthusiast,who started playing chess some ten years ago!!. I play the Colle (K) and London as White. French / Dutch (mainly Stonewall) as Black. Would like to learn 1.d4 2.c4 systems. Any recommendations?
    Many Thanks & Best Wishes!.

  9. michael
    September 23rd, 2012 at 00:24 | #9

    Hello Judit,
    As a young player did you do more tactic’s and endgames or more master games?
    I am a chess coach and work with 6 yr old’s thru high school age.
    Thank you,
    Michael from US.

  10. Michel Barbaut
    September 23rd, 2012 at 00:48 | #10

    Hi Judit,
    I would like to know if you have any regret(s) about your chess career and what is your best chess souvenir ?
    Susan has been women world champion but you not (at least at the moment) … it should have been honorary for you and your country that you won this title (even if everybody knows that you’re the strongest women chessplayer probably for ever) any chance one day ?

    Thanks … and please play till you’re eighty !!

    Michel from France (and happy father of three lovely daughters … who start playing chess 😉 )

  11. Michael
    September 23rd, 2012 at 01:35 | #11

    Hi Judit,

    Congrats on your new book!!! What do you think the one thing a player should do every day to improve his tactics and strategy, puzzles in books, playing through old games, chess tactics software. What do you do in this area to stay sharp? Have you considered writing a book for Quality Chess on the Sicilian Taimanov, I mean when you think Taimanov you think Judit Polgar!!!

    Wishing you the best in all that you do, keep it up, and wonderful career, and thank you for sharing your experiences with us!!!

  12. Jacob Aagaard
    September 23rd, 2012 at 12:45 | #12
  13. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 16:48 | #13

    @garryk
    I really do not like to play against computers,it kills the emotional part of the game.

  14. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 16:51 | #14

    @SovietSchool
    In principle me and my sisters got the same education,but of course my parents were using there experience and I had lot of help and support from Susan and Sofia.

  15. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 16:53 | #15

    @Jay

    Hou is a good 2600 player I am sure if she is focusing more on open events she can improve,but the higher you go the small things count more.

  16. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 16:54 | #16

    @Wayne Hatcher

    I admired a lot Garry Kasparov’s attacking style specially in the King’s Indian but I have many players who I learned from.

  17. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 16:58 | #17

    dfan :
    Hi Judit, I’m looking forward to your book very much! What do you feel is the biggest difference between you and a 2600 player? Between you and a 2800 player?

    2800 is pure professional,training daily 10 hours and not only that but he’s mind is always ready for a good idea!Completely focusing on chess!

  18. Jesse
    September 24th, 2012 at 17:01 | #18

    Hi Judit,
    I’m the father or two and had lots of trouble keeping my concentration once the children appeared. How did your feelings, concentration, mental process at the board change once you became a mother.

  19. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 17:07 | #19

    Seth :
    Dear Judit,
    First, congratulations on a fine career that will hopefully continue for a long time!
    Chess has undergone many changes over the years: the Romantic era of Morphy’s day, the birth of positional play with Steinitz, the hypermoderns with Reti, etc. What do you think sets the current era of chess apart from the past and what do you think the next big evolutionary step will be?
    Thank you for your time,
    Seth from the United States

    In the last decade chess became much more of a sport then before.Preparation is the biggest difference now days.Using databases of many millions of games and preparing with analysing engines it makes it lot different.
    I think it is possible that draw offers will be demolished.

  20. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:27 | #20

    Jesse :
    Hi Judit,
    I’m the father or two and had lots of trouble keeping my concentration once the children appeared. How did your feelings, concentration, mental process at the board change once you became a mother.

    @Oldsalt
    I believe ones you get children the priority’s change in your life no matter if you are a mother or father!!! I know that my kids are in good hands while I am playing somewhere in the world so I can focus on chess,but I am a very rational person.

  21. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:33 | #21

    Michael :
    Hi Judit,
    Congrats on your new book!!! What do you think the one thing a player should do every day to improve his tactics and strategy, puzzles in books, playing through old games, chess tactics software. What do you do in this area to stay sharp? Have you considered writing a book for Quality Chess on the Sicilian Taimanov, I mean when you think Taimanov you think Judit Polgar!!!
    Wishing you the best in all that you do, keep it up, and wonderful career, and thank you for sharing your experiences with us!!!

    Tactical puzzels are great,I solved those all my life:)! Yusupov has a great series with quality chess I also use them ,it does explain everything in a way so the reader understands it very clearly.I think if you would like to stay sharp then make sure that you make the puzzle the most acurate way and NEVER cheat yourself,it prevents you from improving!!
    I am happy that you like my Taimanov games I have some good ones in my book too!:)First let me start and finish volume 2 and 3:)

  22. Patrick
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:34 | #22

    Judit,

    I am 37, first learned how to play chess in 1983 when I was 8, first picked up a chess book in 1995 while in college, played in my first ever tournament in June 1996, and started playing regularly since March 1997, having played over 2000 games.

    I’ve studied tons of master games, about 90% of which being in openings that I specifically played at the time studied. Studied many tactics/problems, and some strategy guides. From 1997 to 2001, I’ve jumped about 200 to 300 points per year.

    I first hit 2000 in August 2001, and first remained steadily above 2000 in 2004. Since then, I’ve seemed to plateau. I’ve never been above 2091, and between 2004 and 2012, I’ve maybe gained 20 points in terms of where I tend to remain stable (about 2025 in 2004, 2045 to 2050 now).

    What did you typically do when you saw signs of hitting a plateau to get past that? In my case, that would be trying to reach 2100.

  23. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:36 | #23

    Michel Barbaut :
    Hi Judit,
    I would like to know if you have any regret(s) about your chess career and what is your best chess souvenir ?
    Susan has been women world champion but you not (at least at the moment) … it should have been honorary for you and your country that you won this title (even if everybody knows that you’re the strongest women chessplayer probably for ever) any chance one day ?
    Thanks … and please play till you’re eighty !!
    Michel from France (and happy father of three lovely daughters … who start playing chess )

    Best chess souvenir?My gold medals from the olympiads:)

  24. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:39 | #24

    michael :
    Hello Judit,
    As a young player did you do more tactic’s and endgames or more master games?
    I am a chess coach and work with 6 yr old’s thru high school age.
    Thank you,
    Michael from US.

    Tactics were always my favorite and I think it is the most entertaining for kids!I could appreciate much later only the positional master pieces.Endgames and study’s can be lots of fun too but for that you need more time to enjoy it!Great that you teach kids!

  25. Judit Polgar
    September 24th, 2012 at 20:45 | #25

    Patrick :
    Judit,
    I am 37, first learned how to play chess in 1983 when I was 8, first picked up a chess book in 1995 while in college, played in my first ever tournament in June 1996, and started playing regularly since March 1997, having played over 2000 games.
    I’ve studied tons of master games, about 90% of which being in openings that I specifically played at the time studied. Studied many tactics/problems, and some strategy guides. From 1997 to 2001, I’ve jumped about 200 to 300 points per year.
    I first hit 2000 in August 2001, and first remained steadily above 2000 in 2004. Since then, I’ve seemed to plateau. I’ve never been above 2091, and between 2004 and 2012, I’ve maybe gained 20 points in terms of where I tend to remain stable (about 2025 in 2004, 2045 to 2050 now).
    What did you typically do when you saw signs of hitting a plateau to get past that? In my case, that would be trying to reach 2100.

    I think it is very important that you analyse your games and think carefully in which part of the game do you do mistakes.Questions to ask:do I have time trouble?Do I get tired when I made the mistake?Playing a quick move?Do I make weak moves or blunder in 1 move?
    Please do not use chess engine to ask advice,analyse first yourself and use engines ONLY for checking if you did a good job or not!
    Solving problems before the game also helps to get your brain working.If you will read my book I am writing there a lot how I was having my training sessions so it might help you!Hope to hear next time that you are 2200:)!

  26. kstevens
    September 24th, 2012 at 21:30 | #26

    Hi Judit,

    I hope I’m not too late. I am not a strong player by any means (1500), although I have been playing chess mostly for fun, entering a tournament here and there for about 15 years. It was only last year when I decided to take Chess more seriously. I am 45 and set a goal for myself to raise my rating over 2000. I have been entering more tournaments and my rating has improved (from 1300 to 1500).

    Talking with different Chess players I have heard different recommendations – from having only one opening repertoire to focusing all my time on tactics. Being married, 45, with a wonderful son and work, my time is limited. A Chess coach is also kind of expensive for me at this time, especially since I am not winning the tournaments I am entering.

    With the above in mind for a man whose time is limited (maybe 2 hours per day), but still wants to make that goal of achieving a rating of over 2000, what type of training would you suggest?

  27. Michael
    September 24th, 2012 at 22:04 | #27

    @Judit Polgar
    Thank you so much for your time and advice, I own the first 4 Yusupov books and will use them as the core of my training, and best of luck on your next 2 books. And maybe some day a book on the Taimanov! Day dreaming out loud…

    Best Regards,

    Michael

  28. Andy
    September 25th, 2012 at 22:47 | #28

    Dear Judit

    What did you learn from your meetings with Bobby Fischer? And what were the most memorable moments with him?

    All the best
    Andy

  29. Seth
    September 26th, 2012 at 03:31 | #29

    Come on, people! Don’t be scared! Keep the questions going. 🙂

    Hi again, Judit.

    How difficult is it to readjust to an unpleasant surprise during the middle of a game? For example: you were close to winning a move ago but you overlooked something and are in danger of becoming worse. What do you do to regain control? And what advice can you give to players who want to be mentally tougher?

    Thanks again,
    Seth from the United States

  30. John
    September 26th, 2012 at 06:44 | #30

    Judit,

    did you ever feel _bad_ about winning one of your games?
    e.g. because you played poorly and won anyway because of a bad blunder or time problem;
    e.g. because you felt sorry for your opponent.

  31. wolfsblut
    September 26th, 2012 at 18:57 | #31

    @Judit Polgar

    I was always curious about supergrandmasters view at openings. Are they only tools for them or are some of them in their opinion just bad? What about the French for example- what is your opinion about this defence and why you don´t play it? Are there openings where you not believe in?
    Thank you for your time!
    Greeting

  32. Judit Polgar
    September 26th, 2012 at 21:24 | #32

    Andy :
    Dear Judit
    What did you learn from your meetings with Bobby Fischer? And what were the most memorable moments with him?
    All the best
    Andy

    I will recall my memories and tell about it in volume 2:)!

  33. Judit Polgar
    September 26th, 2012 at 21:29 | #33

    Seth :
    Come on, people! Don’t be scared! Keep the questions going.
    Hi again, Judit.
    How difficult is it to readjust to an unpleasant surprise during the middle of a game? For example: you were close to winning a move ago but you overlooked something and are in danger of becoming worse. What do you do to regain control? And what advice can you give to players who want to be mentally tougher?
    Thanks again,
    Seth from the United States

    For axemple at the Olympiad this year I played against Vocaturo.I had a pawn up practically winning but while I went to a concreat calculation taught that I am winning on the spot,he made a move which I blundered and I felt that it will be a draw.I switched my brain not to think about the mistake I did before but focus what I have at the board right there.
    This is the most difficult to move on and not to think about what have I done a move ago…

  34. Mark
    September 26th, 2012 at 21:30 | #34

    I would like to know if Judit thinks the educational methods of her parents which had such wonderful results with Judit and her sisters have further application for other subjects and should they be more widely applied to the benefit of many children.

  35. Judit Polgar
    September 26th, 2012 at 21:33 | #35

    John :
    Judit,
    did you ever feel _bad_ about winning one of your games?
    e.g. because you played poorly and won anyway because of a bad blunder or time problem;
    e.g. because you felt sorry for your opponent.

    Yes it happened when I felt that my win came easily or I was lucky,but at the boardI most of the time have my fighting spirit.

  36. Judit Polgar
    September 26th, 2012 at 21:39 | #36

    wolfsblut :
    @Judit Polgar
    I was always curious about supergrandmasters view at openings. Are they only tools for them or are some of them in their opinion just bad? What about the French for example- what is your opinion about this defence and why you don´t play it? Are there openings where you not believe in?
    Thank you for your time!

    There are few things about opening.First one has to choose which opening he/she feels comfortable with ,the structure?Can I surprise my opponent with this opening?How much time do I need to learn it?Do I believe in the system?
    Against the French I won many games with white!Somehow with black I never had the temptation to play it seriously,I did a few occasion tough.

    Greeting

  37. Seth
    September 27th, 2012 at 09:01 | #37

    Hi Judit,

    Thank you so much for answering our questions!

    Are there any “main” openings that you think aren’t good or that you are particularly happy to see played against you? For example, you mention that you have a good score vs the French Defense and that is a mainline opening. Are there any others besides the French you like to play against?

    I remember reading somewhere that GM Michael Adams loves it when someone plays the Pirc against him and some Grandmasters believe they start the game with a “free pawn” when someone plays the Benko Gambit against them.

    Much appreciated,
    Seth from the United States

  38. Seth
    September 27th, 2012 at 09:03 | #38

    P.S. I also like the idea of a Polgar book on the Taimanov. I have played it over 30 times in tournaments and have only lost once. I would definitely buy it. 🙂

    -Seth from the United States

  39. September 27th, 2012 at 10:12 | #39

    Hi Judit,

    I´ve some questions,too.

    The higher my rating (~2200), the more I´ve the feeling I know nothing about chess.
    What about you with your 2700+ rating? Do you always know what you are doing or does it happen that you just make a move and hope for the best?

    Recently on chessbase.com Hou Yifan and Aronian gave an interview and mentioned, they would work on chess about five to six houres daily. On his blog, Magnus Carlsen mentioned, that he didn´t work on chess for weeks and avoids opening training.
    How do you evaluate these statements?

    Thanks in advance and best wishes,

    gewgaw from germany

  40. Marl
    September 27th, 2012 at 10:24 | #40

    Hi Judith!

    Would you recommend a professional chess career for someone who probably can’t get much further than the 2600 mark. How much money do you think someone around 2550 ELO would make per annual income?

    Thanks and best wishes!

  41. boki
    September 27th, 2012 at 10:53 | #41

    Hi Judith

    do you still read chess books ? What were the last books you read? Do you use opening books?

    best whishes

  42. September 27th, 2012 at 19:48 | #42

    Hello Judit,

    my congrats on your great book! I enjoyed it a lot and produced a video review on it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_n_pE4NGAPs

    I hope you like it!

    Cheers,

    Christof Sielecki
    Chessexplained on Youtube

  43. September 28th, 2012 at 07:03 | #43

    Hello Judith!

    I have got some questions to you – I am glad QC staff has given us such a award/prize 🙂

    1) Do you analyse your (torunament) games with the engine(s)? If yes – how and what is its name?
    2) What are the most difficult elements to improve in your level, 2600 level, 2400, 2200 and 2000 – some time ago you were at these, right? 🙂
    3) Do you want to punish, crush or destroy your opponents at the chessboard? Or do you just play and try to find the best moves? What is your approach?
    4) When are you most focused, satisfied and dissapointed when playing (finishing) a game? What elements at chess gives you most fun and entertainment?
    5) Do you change your approach when playing men or women?
    6) What is the most difficult in writing a chess book? Do you see it painful process or rather fun and creative?

    Thank you very much and good luck at chess and in your life! 🙂

  44. Michel Barbaut
    September 28th, 2012 at 07:19 | #44

    Hi Judit,

    If you were not a chessplayer, what do you think you would like to be ? (job)
    Thx.

  45. Gramsci
    September 28th, 2012 at 09:30 | #45

    Hi Judit,

    Why did you give up the King’s Indian for the less attacking Nimzo-Indian?

    Thx and greetings from the sunny but impoverished Spain.

  46. Trefor5D
    September 28th, 2012 at 13:25 | #46

    Good afternoon Judit,
    Thank you for producing such a lovely book. My copy arrived yesterday and I enjoyed reading it very much. Of course I have only started the first chapter, but already I can feel the effort and time that has been put into the work, indeed just looking at the book creates a good feeling, Quality certainly do provide quality books.
    I am in my early 50s and playing at around 2000 I guess ( I have also enjoyed a couple of ICC lessons with your sister!)

    My question relates to my granddaughter – she is 2 and a half (30 months) old and is already pestering me to play chess 🙂 I have taught her the names of the pieces but not yet how they move. What age would you recommend as the ideal starting age to learn chess?

    Kind regards
    Trefor x

    p.s. I see books 2 and 3 are listed on the back cover are they finished, and when do you anticipate publication?

  47. Miq
    September 28th, 2012 at 20:21 | #47

    I´ve read through the whole book, textwise and gone through the few variations I could hold in my head and want to say thank you for taking the time to write it. Your expression of pure passion for chess is inspiring? I will read the book again and this time go through all the variations and also write down your most important advice about positions to make them easier to remember when playing games myself. Really looking forwards to books 2 and 3.

    I also have a question about improvement – not having a chess coach or regular playing partner, what do you think is the best training method for me? I am around 2000 with approximately 2 hours a day for chess study and would like to close in on 2300.

    Good luck in the future Judit and thank you (and quality chess) for producing the book and making it affordable. Thanks also for visiting the blog, such a thing is very unusual!

  48. Waldorf
    September 29th, 2012 at 07:41 | #48

    ops, i am probably too late, but I will ask it anyway.
    I am about 2000-2100 rating and my biggest problem is the ability to calculate variations and to visualize the chessboard in my mind.

    How can I improve?

  49. Jacob Aagaard
    September 29th, 2012 at 19:30 | #49

    THE BLOG IS NOW CLOSED FOR NEW QUESTIONS!

  50. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:33 | #50

    Seth :
    Hi Judit,
    Thank you so much for answering our questions!
    Are there any “main” openings that you think aren’t good or that you are particularly happy to see played against you? For example, you mention that you have a good score vs the French Defense and that is a mainline opening. Are there any others besides the French you like to play against?
    I remember reading somewhere that GM Michael Adams loves it when someone plays the Pirc against him and some Grandmasters believe they start the game with a “free pawn” when someone plays the Benko Gambit against them.
    Much appreciated,
    Seth from the United States

    I like to play against openings where I am prepared and happy with the type of position!

  51. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:43 | #51

    gewgaw :
    Hi Judit,
    I´ve some questions,too.
    The higher my rating (~2200), the more I´ve the feeling I know nothing about chess.
    What about you with your 2700+ rating? Do you always know what you are doing or does it happen that you just make a move and hope for the best?
    Recently on chessbase.com Hou Yifan and Aronian gave an interview and mentioned, they would work on chess about five to six houres daily. On his blog, Magnus Carlsen mentioned, that he didn´t work on chess for weeks and avoids opening training.
    How do you evaluate these statements?
    Thanks in advance and best wishes,
    gewgaw from germany

    Well it does happen to me too!It is important to analyse more time and somehow to clear it so that during the game you understand at least some of the plans of the position.
    There are some players work many ,many hours also for example Aronian I believe there are quite a few helpers he has and also an incredible talent!
    I can only add that chess is not an 8 to 4 job!

  52. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:48 | #52

    Marl :
    Hi Judith!
    Would you recommend a professional chess career for someone who probably can’t get much further than the 2600 mark. How much money do you think someone around 2550 ELO would make per annual income?
    Thanks and best wishes!

    Well this is a question that everyone has to answer him/herself.I think it is very important,how talented you are,how much do you love the game?,how dedicated you are?,which country do you live in?,how social you are and open so to look for tournaments?,How much is it important to you that by playing chess you can see the worlds most beutyfull places?,what standard of living you expect to have?,are you someone who likes adventures or goes for a safe life(if you can have it these days at all?).
    After all it is your life,chess for sure it is not a profession that you choose to have a good income,you do it because you love it!

  53. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:50 | #53

    boki :
    Hi Judith
    do you still read chess books ? What were the last books you read? Do you use opening books?
    best whishes

    I was reading lately Kotov,Marin ,Aagaard on tactics,and Yusupov also Nunn endgame books and Dvoretzky.I like a lot endgames and study’s.

  54. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:52 | #54

    Christof Sielecki :
    Hello Judit,
    my congrats on your great book! I enjoyed it a lot and produced a video review on it.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_n_pE4NGAPs
    I hope you like it!
    Cheers,
    Christof Sielecki
    Chessexplained on Youtube

    I am very happy if you liked the book,I was really working a lot and enjoying doing it.Next month I will start working on volume 2!:)

  55. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:54 | #55

    Michel Barbaut :
    Hi Judit,
    If you were not a chessplayer, what do you think you would like to be ? (job)
    Thx.

    I like to be creative and work with energetic and optimistic people who enjoy what they are doing,this is extremely important for me!

  56. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:54 | #56

    Gramsci :
    Hi Judit,
    Why did you give up the King’s Indian for the less attacking Nimzo-Indian?
    Thx and greetings from the sunny but impoverished Spain.

    Well I will talk about this in volume 2!

  57. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 20:59 | #57

    Trefor5D :
    Good afternoon Judit,
    Thank you for producing such a lovely book. My copy arrived yesterday and I enjoyed reading it very much. Of course I have only started the first chapter, but already I can feel the effort and time that has been put into the work, indeed just looking at the book creates a good feeling, Quality certainly do provide quality books.
    I am in my early 50s and playing at around 2000 I guess ( I have also enjoyed a couple of ICC lessons with your sister!)
    My question relates to my granddaughter – she is 2 and a half (30 months) old and is already pestering me to play chess I have taught her the names of the pieces but not yet how they move. What age would you recommend as the ideal starting age to learn chess?
    Kind regards
    Trefor x
    p.s. I see books 2 and 3 are listed on the back cover are they finished, and when do you anticipate publication?

    Wow you were fast to get my book!:)It is great if she is interested about the pieces already,I would recommend to move on with her as she asks for it,but around 4 -5 is a good age to start.I believe that you have to go slowly and enjoy the small steps for ex. playing games with a knight on the board and then slowly the other pieces can come to the board,but first only one by one!The basics are very important!

  58. Judit Polgar
    September 29th, 2012 at 21:04 | #58

    Waldorf :
    ops, i am probably too late, but I will ask it anyway.
    I am about 2000-2100 rating and my biggest problem is the ability to calculate variations and to visualize the chessboard in my mind.
    How can I improve?

    Try to solve tactics which are 2-4 moves when you are good in that only then move on to move difficult ones.In calculation the most important thing to be accurate!You can work on visualize the chessboard if you know all the squers by hart which one is what colour, then you can try to memorize a position with few pieces.Finally try to play a game with a friend how many moves can you play without seeing the board?Always be very proud when you improve a little!

  59. Seth
    September 29th, 2012 at 22:47 | #59

    Thank you so much for your time!

    -Seth from the USA

  60. jaja
    September 30th, 2012 at 04:08 | #60

    I got the book last week. This is the only chess book I am aware of where the diagrams are placed not just once in a while randomly but at precisely the right places so that a normal club player can read the book in bed without a chess set.

    Praise to Judit who obviously has spent all the effort on this for the reader.

    And of course what there is to read is really fantastic too.

    Too late for questions I guess, but in case not I’d like to ask Judit why she thinks no other woman player has ever made it to the (say) top 30.

  61. Владимир
    October 8th, 2012 at 10:48 | #61

    Хорошая книга Мне понравилась!

  62. November 10th, 2012 at 18:31 | #62

    Dear judith

    Is it necessary to memorize every theory of opening and variations. Have you memorize all those theories.i have maybe a dumb observation playing with carlsen he usually use opponent’s unexpected variations he takes advantage on familiarity.

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