Books in use…

January 17th, 2020 No comments

IM Coen Leenhouts from the Netherlands very kindly sent us the above photo with the caption: “Spent a couple of weeks with wonderful reading material🙂” And he added “The Anand Files however I found fascinating to read.”

Thanks for that. And we will forgive you for having two non-QC books out of the six.

The Anand Files features prominently in that photo, and is receiving fantastic reviews. For example: “The Anand Files is a triumph, beautifully written and accompanied by more than one hundred full-color photos. Abeln has done his subject justice and the only flaw in the work is that it ends.” John Hartmann, Chess Life

Categories: Reviews Tags:

Coming Soon…

January 9th, 2020 36 comments

We have updated our Coming Soon page with some titles we plan to publish in Spring and Summer of 2020. It’s quite a few books, so I will keep the details brief in this post. You can read more about each book on its own webpage, as linked below. The first five books below are expected in Spring 2020.

Playing the Grünfeld by Alexey Kovalchuk. The title tells the story – a fighting repertoire against 1.d4 by a talented young Russian player.

GM Mihail Marin will supply a two-volume Black repertoire against 1.d4 using 1…f5, with the aggressive Leningrad Dutch at its heart. The titles are Leningrad Dutch and Dutch Sidelines.

The 2600+ Ukrainian GM Martyn Kravtsiv is writing two volumes from White’s perspective after 1.e4 e5. The title Italian Renaissance tell the story – Bc4 is White’s choice, covered at both move 2 and 3, for added flexibility. There will be Volume I and Volume 2.

The following four titles are expected in Summer 2020.

Read more…
Categories: Publishing Schedule Tags:

Free ‘Book of the Month’ – January and February

January 6th, 2020 No comments

Firstly, a belated Happy New Year from everyone at Quality Chess.

And secondly, we are continuing our free-fourth-book offer – if you buy three books or more and live in the normal European Union zone (as defined by UPS – for example, they exclude some islands and remote areas) we will send you an extra book free.

Please note that if you buy a Special Offer and are in the EU zone, we will add one free book. For example, if a European buys the Special Offer on our award-winning Grandmaster Preparation series, then we would send the 6 hardcovers, plus one free extra book.

The previous default option on the free book was The Alterman Gambit Guide – White Gambits. For January and February we will switch the default option to The Alterman Gambit Guide – Black Gambits Volume 1. But if you already have that book, or would prefer a different free book, then send us an email to salesgroup@qualitychess.co.uk with your order, asking to have it replaced with one of the following titles:

ATTACKING THE SPANISH
CARLSEN’S ASSAULT ON THE THRONE
CHAMPIONS OF THE NEW MILLENNIUM
CUTTING EDGE 1: THE OPEN SICILIAN
CUTTING EDGE 2: SICILIAN NAJDORF 6.Be3
GRANDMASTER BATTLE MANUAL
GRANDMASTER REPERTOIRE 7 – THE CARO-KANN (HB)
GRANDMASTER VERSUS AMATEUR
REGGIO EMILIA 2007/2008
THE ALTERMAN GAMBIT GUIDE – WHITE GAMBITS
THE ALTERMAN GAMBIT GUIDE – BLACK GAMBITS VOLUME 2
SAN LUIS 2005

Categories: Publishing Schedule Tags:

The Nimzo-Indian in action

December 18th, 2019 12 comments

Our friend Renier Castellanos has written another blog post for us. To download it as a PGN file go here.

Jamie Santos Latasa – Sophie Milliet, Sunway Sitges Open 2019

Opening Preparation As expressed in my previous blog post (see the Taimanov in Action) being well prepared in the opening is one of the key factors to obtain a good result when playing against a more experienced, higher rated and overall stronger opponent. I wouldn’t say opening preparation is a vital element to play good chess but it is surely a useful tool disposable to every chess player. The benefits of learning openings are many but these three are my main motivation: – Save time on the clock that will be used later at critical moments – Guarantee yourself a reliable position – Surprise an unaware opponent with a line In the game we are about to see, Sophie Milliet, a strong IM from France plays against the Spanish GM Jaime Santos Latasa. We can’t tell for certain how IM Milliet prepared for this specific game but she played an interesting opening line that features in Michael Roiz’s fantastic book The Nimzo Indian Defence.

Read more…
Categories: Publishing Schedule Tags:

The Thinkers on US TV

December 13th, 2019 2 comments

If you are watching TV in the USA this evening, there is a chance you may see a Quality Chess book lurking as a ‘background prop’. It is on a show called “The Blacklist”, 8:00–9:00 PM EST 13th December on NBC . Apparently there is also an NBC app.

It’s not certain The Thinkers will make the ‘final cut’. And even if it does, the book does not feature in the story; it’s just part of the background scenery. But I hope the point will be to show that one of the main characters has great taste in books.

If you do see David Llada’s book on NBC, then please let us know in the comments. As we Hollywood types say – that’s a wrap.

Categories: Authors in Action, Reviews Tags:

The Sicilian Taimanov – a problem and solutions

December 11th, 2019 9 comments

A reader, “Mr X”, pointed out a big improvement for White in a sideline given in The Sicilian Taimanov. So, with thanks to Mr X, I will share the problem line, and offer a couple of my own suggestions to patch the sideline.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qf3 Nf6 8.0–0–0 Ne5 9.Qg3 b5 10.a3!? Bb7! 11.Bxb5!? Rc8 12.Bd3

The author met this rare sideline with a sharp line leading to a repetition. It’s on page 423 of Chapter 20. But there is a problem lurking at the end of that line, as Mr X pointed out in an email to us.

The main line continues 12.Be2 Neg4 and then, for example, 13.Qxc7 Rxc7 when Black has ample compensation.

12…Nh5 13.Qg5 g6 14.f4 f5 15.fxe5 Be7 16.Qh6 Bf8

With a repetition, was the expectation. Except, as Mr X pointed out, White has a superb queen sacrifice.

Read more…
Categories: GM Repertoire Tags:

A Recurring Mistake by committed by Super-GMs

November 29th, 2019 5 comments

Our friend Renier returns with annotations of a recent game. You can see the game here or you can download it with this link.

David Navara – Robert Ris

European Club Cup 14.11.2019

Renier Castellanos

Trust, but verify A common tradition in chess is to copy our colleagues whenever they play a new idea in certain opening. In the recent Chess.com FIDE Grand Swiss we witnessed a funny situation when Alexei Shirov, playing next to Sergey Karjakin decided to follow Karjakin’s novelty in a well-known position of the Sicilian Four Knights. A peculiar situation but not new to me. Few years back I was playing in the Ortisei (Italy) Open when a something similar happened. Nisipeanu played a new (strong idea) in a popular variation and the opponent of a friend of mine started following the Grandmaster’s moves. They were playing very far from the top board but it turns out that there were large screens with the top games in the playing hall. She got up and asked the arbiter to do something about it but it was too late. Something to think about. Back to our main game, the real story behind this comedy is that Karjakin had totally forgotten his game against Yu Yangyi from played in Baku in 2015 and played the wrong move order leading to a lost position. Karjakin managed to get away and win any anyway but Shirov was held to a draw, both were lucky as they could have been severely punished. One would think that this tragicomic incident ends here but it gets better. In the recently finished European Club Ch. David Navara also played Karjakin’s novelty, was he unaware? One thing is certain, his opponent Robert Ris a strong IM and respected theoretician was well informed and ready to serve justice in this line.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Nxc6 6.Ndb5 is also a move here and black has now the option of playing 6…d6 inviting the Sveshnikov or the more fashionable line: 6…Bc5!? 7.Bf4 0–0 8.Bc7 Qe7 9.Bd6 Bxd6 10.Qxd6 Qd8 surprisingly this is back in tournament practice with not bad results for black at all.

6…bxc6 7.e5 Nd5 8.Ne4 Qc7 9.f4 Qb6 10.c4 Bb4+ 11.Ke2 f5 12.exf6 Nxf6 13.Be3 Qd8 14.Nd6+ Bxd6 15.Qxd6 Bb7 So far we have been following a rather forced line of the Four Knights

16.g4 16.Rd1 Is right and it’s what John Shaw recommends in the book Playing 1.e4 Sicilian Mainlines 16…Rc8 17.g4 c5 18.Rg1 Rf8 19.f5 (19.g5 also looks promising and it’s Shaw’s mainline.) 19…Qb6 20.fxe6 dxe6 21.g5 Nd5 22.Qxb6 Nxb6 23.Ke1 Nd7 24.Be2 Ke7 25.Rd3 Be4 26.Ra3 Rc7 27.Kd2 e5 28.Rf1 Rb8 29.Kc3 Rb6 30.Rd1 Rbc6 31.Bg4 Nb6 32.Ra5 g6 33.b3 Bf5 34.Be2 Nd7 35.a3 Be6 36.h4 Bf7 37.Bf3 Rb6 38.Rxd7+ Kxd7 39.Bxc5 e4 40.Bg4+ 1–0 Karjakin – Yu Yangui, Baku 2015

16…c5! Simple, logical, and strong. Black takes over the initiative

17.Rg1 Ne4 18.Qd3 An improvement over Karjakin’s and Shirov’s 18.Qe5 However, statistically white has better chances with 18.Qe5

18.Qe5 Qh4? (18…0–0! and it’s just game over, the white king will not survive long in the centre. For instance 19.Bg2 d6 20.Qxe6+ Kh8 and black will play either Rf6 or Qb6 followed by Rae8 with winning positions in both cases.) 19.Bg2 Qxg4+ And now the two games diverged.

20.Kd3 Nf2+ 21.Bxf2 Bxg2 22.Bxc5 Rc8 23.Rae1 Kf7 24.Re2 Qf3+ 25.Be3 d6 26.Qd4 e5 27.Qxa7+ Ke6 28.Rgxg2 Rxc4 29.Kxc4 Rc8+ 30.Kb4 Qe4+ 31.Bd4 1–0 Karjakin – Dreev, Douglas 2019

20.Bf3 Nc3+ 21.Kd3 Qxf3 22.Kxc3 Rg8 23.Rg3 Qc6 24.Bxc5 0–0–0 25.Bd6 Ba6 26.b3 Kb7 27.Rd1 Rc8 28.Rxg7 Rxg7 29.Qxg7 Bxc4 30.Kb2 Be2 31.Re1 Qxd6 32.Rxe2 Qd1 33.Qg2+ Rc6 34.a4 Qd4+ 35.Ka2 Qxf4 36.Qg7 Rd6 37.Qxh7 Rd1 38.Qh5 Qd4 39.Rb2 e5 40.h4 Rd2 41.Rxd2 Qxd2+ 42.Ka3 Qc1+ 43.Ka2 Qc2+ 44.Ka3 Qc1+ 1/2–1/2 Shirov – Yu Yangyi, Douglas ENG 2019.

18…Qh4!

18…Qf6 also looks strong

19.Rd1??

A natural blunder. Let’s pay attention to the nature of this move, white threatens to take on d7 with check but the rook on d1 also takes away the square d1 leaving the king stuck on e2.

19.Bg2 is the only way to stay in the game 19…Qxh2! 20.Kd1 Nf2+ 21.Bxf2 Bxg2 with a complex middlegame, I suspect white can survive, but that’s the only thing he can hope for

19…0–0!–+

20.h3 On 20.Qxd7 Anything wins 20…Qxh2+ 21.Ke1 Qh4+ 22.Ke2 Rab8 the attack goes on, …Bd5 is a neat threat.

20.Rg2 d5 also winning for black.

20.Bg2 Rxf4! similar to the game

20…Rxf4 21.Qb3 Rf2+ 22.Bxf2 Qxf2+ 23.Kd3 Qxg1 24.Qxb7 Rf8 A win is a win but black could have finished it off in a glorious, unforgettable way.

24…Qg3+! 25.Kxe4 (25.Kc2 Qh2+ 26.Kd3 Nf2+) 25…Rf8! is mate in three moves Rf4,Rf5,Qe5 no matter what. Deserves a diagram 26.Qxd7 Rf4+ 27.Ke5 Rf5+ 28.Kxe6 Qe5#

25.Qxe4 Rxf1 26.Rxf1 Qxf1+ 27.Kc2 Qxh3 28.Qa8+ Kf7 29.Qxa7 Qg2+ 30.Kb3 Qf3+ 31.Ka4 Qc6+ 32.Ka5 e5 33.Qb8 d6 34.Qd8? 34.Qa7+ apparently was more resistant. Not easy for black after this 34…Kf6! (34…Kg6 35.Qe7 and draw is the most likely result) 35.b4!? cxb4 (35…e4 36.b5) 36.Qf2+ Ke6 37.Kxb4 white is still worse, game goes on

34…h6 35.a3 e4 36.b4 cxb4 37.axb4 e3 38.b5 Qe8 39.Qh4 Qe5 40.Ka6 e2 41.Qe1 Ke7 42.b6 Kd7 43.c5 Kc6 44.Qb1 e1Q 45.Qb5+ Kd5 46.c6+ Ke6 47.Qb3+ Qd5 48.Qc2 Qee4 49.Qxe4+ Qxe4 50.Kb7 Kd5 51.c7 Kc5+ 52.Ka7 Qc6

0–1

Categories: Fun Games Tags:

2019 World Cup Quiz–Winners

November 22nd, 2019 2 comments

We have been planning to announce the winner of our World Cup Quiz for a while now, but we wanted to announce all the winners at once. Yes, there was a tie for first when all the correct answers were known. Five winners, but only three have replied to our emails.

So congratulations to Vilka Sipila of Finland, Stefan Liepold of Germany, and Marija Martinović of Croatia. The latter, before her marriage, was named Marija Čačić, and was one of the winners of our 2015 World Cup quiz. So clearly a chess-quizzing star.

It is a five-way share of 20 books, so 4 books each, but we expanded that to 5 books each, just to be friendly. Books will be on the way to the winners.

As for the two missing winners, we have email addresses, which of course I will not publish here. But we are still seeking them. Based on email addresses, one missing winner seems to be Italian while the other is Croatian. So if you happen to be Italian or Croatian and entered our quiz, then please check your emails, or see if you scored 14/27 points – that was the winning total.

Categories: Prizes Tags: