Home > GM Repertoire, Publishing Schedule > Mihail Marin on the Leningrad Dutch

Mihail Marin on the Leningrad Dutch

We have a book underway that I feel like announcing: a Grandmaster Repertoire on the Leningrad Dutch by Mihail Marin. When will it be published? No idea. As always, that depends on how smoothly the analysis and writing goes. And how wide awake our editors are.

This book will be a complete repertoire for Black starting after 1.d4 f5. In fact, Mihail will also offer some brief thoughts on other first moves such as 1.Nf3 and 1.c4 from a Dutch player’s perspective.

It’s early days to be mentioning this book, but a few readers have commented on this blog about their desire for a Leningrad Dutch book, so it feels right to say: “We agree, and we are working on it.”

Categories: GM Repertoire, Publishing Schedule Tags:
  1. Dobby
    January 22nd, 2019 at 18:25 | #1

    Wow, that‘s absolutely great! I‘m pleased to hold a high-quality-book on this topic in my hand… It fits great, because I’m just analyzing this exciting system from the perspective of a correspondence chess player (looking for the absolute truth) and notice that the existing literature is at least, …hmmmm, superficial… Have fun and good luck ! 🙂

  2. Pi-Jo
    January 22nd, 2019 at 18:37 | #2

    Great news!
    I am just studying the Leningrad now with Pruijssers & Williams excellent work.

    Will Marin cover 7…Qe8 or 7…c6?

  3. TD
    January 22nd, 2019 at 19:18 | #3

    This is thé book I’ve been waiting for!

  4. RYV
    January 22nd, 2019 at 19:21 | #4

    Good job.

  5. Franck Steenbekkers
    January 22nd, 2019 at 19:29 | #5

    I think this book will be published at the end of 2019..will there a update once of his excellent c4 trilogy

  6. Dobby
    January 22nd, 2019 at 20:05 | #6

    I‘m sure it‘ll be 7…c6! And Marin can neutralize Avrukhs 2B-recommendations…

  7. Bebbe
    January 22nd, 2019 at 21:11 | #7

    This is just great News! This is a must buy!
    Really looking forward to this one.
    I also think it will be 7.-c6. Finaly the dynamic Leningrad Dutch gets the treatment it deserves.

  8. Thomas
    January 22nd, 2019 at 21:19 | #8

    Thumbs up on this one.

  9. Hard Truther
    January 23rd, 2019 at 01:55 | #9

    A solid addition. Absolutely will be buying.

  10. Till
    January 23rd, 2019 at 02:09 | #10

    Pi-Jo :
    Great news!
    I am just studying the Leningrad now with Pruijssers & Williams excellent work.
    Will Marin cover 7…Qe8 or 7…c6?

    It will probably resurrect 7…Nc6.

    I’m hoping for Qe8 but guess it will be c6 (even Kindermann moved to c6 after being a long time advocate for Qe8).

  11. Leon Trotsky
    January 23rd, 2019 at 04:54 | #11

    7…Cc6 is the most “loco” out of the three, and 7…c6 the solidest. I highly doubt it would be 7…Cc6, especially for grandmaster repertoire.

  12. Jimmy
    January 23rd, 2019 at 07:10 | #12

    Great news, I am very much looking forward to this one! And Marin is one of my favourite authors on top of that

  13. Blog Reader
    January 23rd, 2019 at 16:43 | #13

    FYI: I think you blog feeds are broken, http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/blog/feed

    The “feed” only ever shows one single blog entry, just the latest one.

    Ditto for the comments feed, only the one single latest comment.

    http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/blog/comments/feed

  14. Paul
    January 23rd, 2019 at 18:19 | #14

    Dear Quality Chess Team, I’m curious about the new Taimanov book… when do we get the chance to have a look into an excerpt?
    Thank you!

  15. Seth
    January 23rd, 2019 at 18:33 | #15

    This is great news!

  16. BirdFox
    January 23rd, 2019 at 23:57 | #16

    Wow, great news !! I just can’t wait !

  17. Ray
    January 24th, 2019 at 08:47 | #17

    Absolutely great, and a perfect companion to the Pirc! I.m.o. 7…Qe8 is quite playable, and since a recent book by Karolyi already recommended 7…c6, I’m hoping for the former. But either way it’s certainly a must buy!

  18. gewgaw
    January 24th, 2019 at 14:45 | #18

    Give alpha zero some minutes and it will refute the dutch. During its learning phase, it never played the dutch consistently, so there must be something wrong with it.

  19. TonyRo
    January 24th, 2019 at 17:33 | #19

    Excellent news!

  20. Ray
    January 24th, 2019 at 17:45 | #20

    @gewgaw
    Luckily most of my opponents don’t play on the level of Alpha Zero.

  21. Pi-Jo
    January 24th, 2019 at 22:05 | #21

    @gewgaw
    So it’s just three opening books?
    The Berlin & The Queen’s Gambit Declined for Black & The English for white? 😉

    Stockfish actually won one of it’s games vs Alpha-Zero with… the Leningrad!

    At the moment I am learning the Leningrad, entering my variations in Mac Chess Explorer as a good boy and checking the eval’s with SF 10 (with contempt 0).
    SF 10 is quite optimistic (+ 0,6 FWIW) about white when it doesn’t look to deep, compared to the superficial eval’s it gives in Nimzo-Indian (around +0,2) lines. I don’t know what to make of it, but I thought it was interesting.

  22. January 25th, 2019 at 10:40 | #22

    The Leningrad Dutch is not an opening to get equality but to overtake initiative quickly. Taking into the account logic of the game we assume White must make some mistakes to make it happen but isn’t chess the game of mistakes after all?
    If you are not 2600 or close to that level (and I am sure most readers are not but they care as if they were) I believe it’s a perfectly fine opening and you shouldn’t think about engine’s evaluation such as +0.5. I’ve been suffering in this opening playing against strong GMs (but maybe I’d suffer in other openings too) but it serves me as a great weapon to score points against other players. Playing for a win as Black is what every ambitious player needs when playing open events.

  23. Frank
    January 25th, 2019 at 11:48 | #23

    Will you be playing Alpha0 in the near future?@gewgaw

  24. January 25th, 2019 at 21:54 | #24

    piongu :
    The Leningrad Dutch is not an opening to get equality but to overtake initiative quickly. Taking into the account logic of the game we assume White must make some mistakes to make it happen but isn’t chess the game of mistakes after all?
    If you are not 2600 or close to that level (and I am sure most readers are not but they care as if they were) I believe it’s a perfectly fine opening and you shouldn’t think about engine’s evaluation such as +0.5. I’ve been suffering in this opening playing against strong GMs (but maybe I’d suffer in other openings too) but it serves me as a great weapon to score points against other players. Playing for a win as Black is what every ambitious player needs when playing open events.

    Ah, so yet another opening not suitable for Correspondence. Sigh.

  25. Leon Trotsky
    January 25th, 2019 at 22:28 | #25

    I am very sure that I have seen 2600+ GMs, even the 2700s play the Leningrad Dutch in the couple past years. And at least more than one.

  26. January 26th, 2019 at 00:35 | #26

    @Alex Relyea In correspondence there is no point in playing tricky openings, uou just need to play for a draw with something solid unless you want to have some fun. Then maybe you can risk and learn something, it depends what you want but it’s not like the Leningrad is loosing. It just doesn’t have the same effect and I am saying this being a big fan of this opening.

    @Leon Trotsky It has been played few times but there is no strong GM who plays it very often. The strongest player who had it as a first opening choice was late GM Vladimir Malaniuk. I learnt from him a lot.

  27. till
    February 10th, 2019 at 04:52 | #27

    Have you considered to include both 7…c6 and 7…Qe8? I would be even happier to see a discussion of 7…Nc6 8.d5 Ne5/Na5 as well. The last books I can remember including all this are the ones by Harding and by Hall & Cartier (both published 19xx).

  28. RYV
    February 10th, 2019 at 20:53 | #28

    I hope he will clearly show the line(s) that are problematic to black.
    make’s the book usefull for both players.

  29. Franck Steenbekkers
    April 26th, 2019 at 05:29 | #29

    is there more news about this book?
    And will there be an update of the publishing schedule?
    It seems that chessbook publishing company s publish less book then in the past.
    With Thinkers Publishing as an excption

  30. Thomas
    April 26th, 2019 at 09:44 | #30

    Franck Steenbekkers :
    It seems that chessbook publishing company s publish less book then in the past.

    Yes. Not much happening anymore.

  31. Mateus
    May 21st, 2019 at 01:18 | #31

    How is Marin’s book about the Dutch lenigrad going?

  32. Michael
    July 2nd, 2019 at 00:02 | #32

    Any up-date on this book?

    Thanks.

  33. PatrickG
    August 24th, 2019 at 16:33 | #33

    Could Quality Chess send a comment on their Internet web site telling us which day/month this book would be available? 2019? 2020? Dont know?

    I’d like to order it ASAP.

    Thks

  34. TD
    October 27th, 2019 at 12:55 | #34

    Is the book expected to be published this year? Or next year? Please, don’t leave us hanging anymore!

  35. Andrew Greet
    October 28th, 2019 at 11:54 | #35

    TD :
    Is the book expected to be published this year? Or next year?

    Yes.

  36. TD
    October 28th, 2019 at 12:27 | #36

    Andrew Greet :

    TD :
    Is the book expected to be published this year? Or next year?

    Yes.

    Do you mean “Yes. No.”? 😉

  37. Seth
    October 29th, 2019 at 06:13 | #37

    Andrew Greet :

    TD :
    Is the book expected to be published this year? Or next year?

    Yes.

    Oh that’s cold.

  38. Andrew Greet
    October 29th, 2019 at 11:07 | #38

    @Seth
    Thank you – it’s moments like those that make the blog worthwhile.

  39. Paul H
    October 29th, 2019 at 12:19 | #39

    @Andrew Greet
    I realise answering questions of the ilk “when will xxxxx” be published is a bit tedious, but if things like this are what makes the blog worthwhile, things must be bad…

  40. Nick Sykes
    October 29th, 2019 at 12:42 | #40

    @Paul H
    Unnecessary

  41. Andrew Greet
    October 29th, 2019 at 13:39 | #41

    @Paul H
    It was a way of saying I enjoy occasional moments of humour, such as answering ‘Yes’ to what was clearly a non-yes/no question rather than churning out the stock answer – and it was good to see at least one other person was on the same wavelength.

  42. Thomas
    October 29th, 2019 at 16:03 | #42

    @Paul H
    Yes, the end is nigh!

  43. Bulkington
    October 29th, 2019 at 16:30 | #43

    @Thomas
    Hi Thomas, I guess you are playing Marin`s Pirc repertoire…I believe you mentioned it somewhere in this blog. How long do you think does it take to pick up the lines and to build up the understanding for someone with 2100 FIDE ? I am a 1…e5 player but flipping through Marin`s book I was wondering about playing 1…d6. Thanks.

  44. Thomas
    October 29th, 2019 at 23:01 | #44

    @Bulkington
    Sorry, you’re wrong, I stopped playing the Pirc long ago. I was thinking about taking it up again with Marin’s book but decided against it.

  45. October 30th, 2019 at 08:23 | #45

    Personally I just add at least 6 months to whatever estimated publication date is given. Not always does it work, but it helps often.

    So for example if it says estimated release December 2019, I would estimate at earliest May 2020.

  46. Riesner
    October 30th, 2019 at 17:27 | #46

    @Bulkington

    You can play Marin’s Pirc, but unfortunately there are a lot of holes in his book. But I think it has nothing to do with the author (I hope so), rather than with this opening. You don’t have the equality like with 1…e5. I play 1…e5 myself and if you are looking to learn a new opening, I can recommend you the book about the Taimainov.

    Nevertheless I will buy Marin’s book about the Leningrad and I hope there are not so many theoretical problems like in the Pirc book.

  47. Bulkington
    October 31st, 2019 at 08:38 | #47

    @Thomas
    OK, thanks anyway.

  48. Bulkington
    October 31st, 2019 at 08:48 | #48

    @Andrew Greet
    Marin from time to time move orders the Leningrad system by 1d4 d6 2Nf3 f5. Now I believe 3Nc3 is considered better for white. Maybe Marin can share a bit of wisdom in his book about this position, e.g. should black fianchetto or not… The position is a bit exotic but it would be cool to have this as an option to bypass some other nasty systems

  49. Tobias
    November 2nd, 2019 at 08:39 | #49

    @Andrew Greet
    Scott Adams is reading this blog apparently:
    https://dilbert.com/strip/2019-11-02

  50. Bulkington
    November 2nd, 2019 at 10:43 | #50

    @Riesner
    Thanks for your advice.

  51. Andrew Greet
    November 4th, 2019 at 15:39 | #51

    @Tobias
    Excellent! I’d like to think the conversation from the cartoon continued:
    “Do you mean yes to option 1?; yes to option 2?; or yes to option 3?”
    “Yes.”

  52. November 4th, 2019 at 21:34 | #52

    Some six months ago I played against Aagard on lichess (it seems the account was verified) and he said the book was almost done. But we all know that these things are hard to do with a high level of quality, like QC nad Marin always do. I bought Playing 1.e4 instead of wait more, and have to say that it was worth every penny.

    Hope this comes soon too.

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